Thank you, Rita Pierson

This woman speaks powerful truths about the world of education and the role of teachers. If you haven’t seen it already, I encourage you to watch her TedTalk, Every Kid Needs A Champion before you continue reading (guaranteed to give you a few laughs and your daily dose of motivation).

Is this job tough? You betcha. Oh God, you betcha. But it is not impossible. We can do this.

How does education relate to development? In some ways, it’s quite obvious. Education is when an individual or a group of people impact the masses – big and small. As is development. Education is learning that is structured by theories and disciplines. As is development. Education can be a chaotic mess. As can development. Educators can be left hopeless, confused, burnt out and unmotivated. As can development practitioners.

There’s another side to it too – a correlation that focuses more on the beauty of education and development than the faults of the structure.

It’s about the value of human connection; of relationships.

Rita Pierson, TedTalk extraordinaire, says it the best: “Can we stand to have more relationships? Absolutely…we come to work when we don’t feel like it, and we’re listening to policy that doesn’t make sense and we [work] anyway. We [work] anyway, because that’s what we do.”

Relationships, the most meaningful of them, are twofold: we are enriched as we are enriching. Limits of relationships extend past the boundaries of education and development. It happens in our everyday lives and demands to be enriching.

This serves as an important reminder for my upcoming 8 month placement in September. Connect well and connect often – on a real, human, personal level. Drawing inspiration from Stephen Covey, Rita insists that the secret to relationships is that we should seek first to understand as opposed to being understood. Or it could be even simpler, like apologizing. So thank you, Rita Pierson. It’s a lesson duly noted.

You ought to just throw in a few simple things, like seeking first to understand, as opposed to being understood. Simple things, like apologizing.You ever thought about that? Tell a kid you’re sorry, they’re in shock.

Rephrasing Rita’s closing statement may be the best way to close this blog:

“Every person deserves a champion, someone who will never give up on them, who understands the power of connection, and insist that they become the best that they can be.”

****************************************************************************************** Feel free to share your thoughts on this TedTalk below! Even better, share one of your favourite videos – funny, inspiring and everything in between. 

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